NYC Healthcare News



Study finds high prevalence of HS-AGING in individuals older than 95

February 11, 2016

In the future, clinicians may be able to utilize cognitive tests with increased accuracy to differentiate a diagnosis of HS-AGING from a general diagnosis of cognitive decline. Being able to pinpoint the cause of cognitive decline may lead to better and more accurate diagnosis and treatment of aging individuals who present with signs of dementia.

"This is an extremely exciting paper because it provides the largest study of HS-AGING in the literature to date, by far. These studies help to define the cognitive features, pathological features, and risk factors that correlate with HS-AGING," said Linda Van Eldik, director of the Sanders-Brown Center on Aging and co-author of the paper.

The next step for Nelson will be to use a grant from the NIH (through the Alzheimer's Disease Genetic Consortium) to study HS-AGING from a genomic approach.

"We want to show the specific genetic fingerprint of HS-AGING so that we can begin to develop ways of better diagnosing and curing the disease during life", said Nelson.

"Our ultimate goal is to prevent or cure the disease, and a greater understanding of the disorder at the genetic and biological levels is critical. Dr. Nelson's studies are providing the essential foundation required for translating the science into new therapies for the Commonwealth of Kentucky and well beyond," summarized Van Eldik.

Source: University of Kentucky