NYC Healthcare News



Study: Stem cell transplant may benefit patients with rapidly progressive MS

February 23, 2016

For 16 people, symptoms improved by an average of one point on the scale after the transplant, and the improvements lasted for an average of two years. The participants also had a reduction in the number and size of lesions in their brains. Two people (six percent) died from complications related to the transplant at two months and 2-1/2 years post-transplant.

Study author Vasilios Kimiskidis, MD, of Aristotle University of Thessaloniki Medical School in Thessaloniki, Greece noted that more research is needed on this treatment, including studies that compare people receiving the treatment to a control group that does not receive the treatment.

"Keeping that in mind, our feeling is that stem cell transplants may benefit people with rapidly progressive MS," he said. "This is not a therapy for the general population of people with MS but should be reserved for aggressive cases that are still in the inflammatory phase of the disease."

 Source: aan.